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Phillip Levine EERCDr. Phillip Levine is a Geomodeler at the EERC, where he works with our clients to provide state-of-the-art geophysical models of the subsurface. He integrates a variety of data from different disciplines, including petrophysics, geophysics, geology, and engineering to create 3-D models. These models are used for dynamic simulations to predict the behavior of rocks under different scenarios.

"As exploration and development involve increasingly complex reservoirs, energy producers are relying more on geomodeling technology to simulate a reservoir before drilling a well to gain a better understanding of the heterogeneity within the reservoir," Phil said. "Geocellular models will continue to be a critical component of energy production as well as carbon storage."

Phil holds a Ph.D. degree in Geology from the University of South Carolina, Columbia; an M.S. degree in Geology from Syracuse University; and a B.S. degree in Biology-Geology from the University of Rochester. Phil previously worked as a software developer of geological and geophysical applications for most of his career.

"I started programming before there was such a thing as computer science, and there weren't a lot of geological and geophysical programs available to the industry. I have been involved with every aspect of the software life cycle, from specification through implementation and development, to technical marketing and sales, training, maintenance, and support," said Phil. "Later I took advantage of my geological training and became a geocellular modeler. I have been working as a modeler building 3-D geological interpretations for the last 12 years."

The opportunity to work as a modeler and conduct research at the University of North Dakota was one of the main attractions of Phil's new position at the EERC. He also finds the variety of EERC projects, including CO2 sequestration, to be challenging as well.

Interestingly, Phil credits undersea adventurer Jacque Cousteau for inspiring his career in energy. A biology major with an interest in marine life, Phillip was enticed by pictures of white sand beaches and palm trees on St. Croix and a presentation by students returning from the West Indies Laboratory there. He had to take several geology classes to get into the program and eventually spent a semester at the West Indies Lab. He had a great time at the lab, learned how his education could be applied to science and research, and started pursuing a Biology–Geology major to gain the necessary background for a student newly interested in carbonate environments.

Phil has a son who works as a stockbroker in Austin, Texas, and a daughter studying Musical Theater at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Although his family was his main focus when his kids were growing up, Phil said he has always managed to jog and ride his bicycle.