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EERC Women in STEM: Overcoming Barriers

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” is a common question to ask children. But what if, when you answered, you were told you couldn’t do that? And what if the fact that you couldn’t do it was because you were a girl?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly 1 in 3 adults holds a bachelor’s degree or higher. The National Science Foundation reports that 57.3% of bachelor’s degrees in all fields in 2013 were earned by women. While college degree attainment rates are higher for females, that is not the case within the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields. Women earn 17.9% of the degrees awarded in computer sciences, 19.3% in engineering, 39% in physical sciences, and 43.1% in mathematics. 

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks employs 174 full time people, 60% of whom have degrees in a STEM field and hold STEM positions. Of those degree-holders at the EERC, 17% are female. 

Experiences in childhood can greatly influence education and career decisions. The female scientists and engineers at the EERC shared their early experiences in their paths to earning STEM degrees.  These women represent a full spectrum of backgrounds and generations. Some graduated from college in the 1970s, and others as recently as 2016. Answers to the question “What DID you want to be when you grew up?” varied from architect to interpreter to marine biologist. 

“My earliest memory of wanting to pursue a STEM career was around age ten,” said Kerryanne Leroux, Senior Chemical Engineer. “I wanted to be an astronaut and the first person to walk on Mars.” 

“I grew up in a large family of eight kids,” said Patty Kleven, Laboratory Analyst. “My siblings went to college if they knew exactly what they were pursuing—such as teaching or nursing. It wasn’t an option for us to explore in higher education, so I had never really thought about it. I wasn’t able to pursue college courses until I was employed at the EERC—after I was married and had children.” 

Even with their differences growing up across different generations, they all have one thing in common: at one point in their childhood, they were told science or math wasn’t for girls.

 

Negative Messages


Some of their experiences hearing this message weren’t necessarily deliberate.

“I was never told directly I couldn’t do something,” said Janelle Hoffarth, Laboratory Analyst. “In fact, I was told the opposite—that I could do whatever I wanted. But women working in these fields wasn’t demonstrated largely in society.”

Amanda Douglas, Research Geophysicist, said, “I wanted to be a civil engineer growing up, but our middle school shop teacher gave the boys in our class extra projects. The boys were asked to build duck houses after class, and we never were. It’s not a blatant ‘This class isn’t for you,’ but it still sends a message that girls don’t belong. This prevented me from taking classes like Computer-Aided Drafting in high school that would have helped foster my desire to be an engineer.” 

Others shared very direct messages they received in childhood.

“I told my high school counselor I wanted to be a wildlife biologist, and he flat-out told me, ‘That’s not a field for girls,’” said Janet Crossland, Research Scientist. “I had always liked being outdoors and struggled in school as a child. It was all I ever wanted to do, and I was devastated by his statement.”

 

Family Support


Despite these obstacles, these women all persisted in their interests in STEM education. They were encouraged by a female family member or were influenced by a story from another female they admired and found that positive reinforcement meant more than the negative messages. The weight of those supports was greater than deliberately oppressive statements from teachers (like being told “That’s not for girls”) or the lack of examples of women in STEM fields.   

“While working on a project for the middle school science fair, my mom ran across a company that provided seismographs for schools,” said Douglas. “She helped me write the grant to get one for my school.”

“My mom encouraged my interest in science,” said Beth Kurz, Principal Hydrogeologist and Laboratory Group Lead. “She would always tell me that I could do anything that I wanted in life if I worked hard enough. She demonstrated that by going back to college at the same time as me to get a degree in geography.”

Leroux said, “My mom always had a love of learning and encouraged us. She read a lot and passed that interest on to me.”

Added Douglas, “I always wanted to know how things worked. Science gave me an avenue to figure that out. I got into geosciences because of my mom. She herself wanted to be a geologist, but was told by a professor that geology wasn’t for women. She never pursued it, but growing up she always took me out hiking so I got exposed to her love for that type of science, and it influenced my interest area.”

“My interest in wildlife started very young, around age four,” said Crossland. “I grew up in a small town in northern Saskatchewan, where bears would go through our trash regularly. I never saw it as a nuisance or danger—I wanted to help feed them.”

“My mom was told she wasn’t good at math, so she quit trying,” said Loreal Heebink, Senior Project Management Specialist. “When she had kids of her own, she pushed us to apply ourselves in whatever field we wanted.”

 

Influencing Factors


While parents definitely influenced their pursuit of STEM fields, some of the EERC female scientists and engineers had encouragement or exposure through programs in which they participated, like Girl Scouts, science fairs, or advanced placement classes.

Crossland’s mother was a Girl Scout leader who brought in speakers and took her troop on outdoor adventures that exposed them to camping, hiking, and science projects. Heebink participated in Math Counts and the science fair every year, and probably would have participated in additional programs had they been available to her in her small community.

“I loved math. One of my math teachers was also the coach of the math club. He knew I was good at math and encouraged me to join. I wasn’t able to fully participate because of issues of logistics and rides to and from practice, but he always let me join in the meets,” said Leroux. “Looking back, knowing that I was sought out to be a valuable part of the math club is impactful still today.”

Kurz took advanced level honors classes in math and science, but kept it quiet.

“I kind of hung out with some rebellious kids, so it definitely wasn’t cool to be smart. I’m proof that you can do both—have fun AND get good grades.”

As one of the younger members of the EERC staff, Douglas noted that she is from the generation that grew up with science clubs and math meets being the norm. She even attended an engineering summer camp for girls.

“I also had the influence of my older sister. She participated in all those things, and of course, I tried to be just like her,” said Douglas.

Teachers also get credit for influencing decisions on careers and college majors in STEM fields, despite messages that they weren’t good choices for girls.

“My third grade teacher really introduced us to science,” said Heebink. “She had eggs that hatched in our room, and had us do experiments to teach us about scientific methods and processes. It provided the structure I needed to guide me through science.”

“My daughter was told in third grade that she couldn’t do math. She fought that stigma her whole life, despite my assurances that the teacher was wrong,” said Hoffarth. “During her senior year, she was told the opposite. What a difference a good and encouraging teacher can make!”

 All of these experiences, both positive and negative, led these women to their fields. In the face of obstacles and the lack of examples of women in STEM while they were growing up, they are now thriving in their careers at the EERC. All of them are now shining examples of successful women in STEM careers for girls today.

This article is the first in a series about women in STEM at the EERC. 

Article written by Nikki Massmann. Photos by Kari Suedel



Senator Hoeven Receives Energy Champion Award

Senator John Hoeven and EERC CEO Tom Erickson
The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) presented its Energy Champion Award to the Honorable John Hoeven, U.S. Senator from North Dakota. The presentation and a reception were held at the EERC on August 21 from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  

Senator Hoeven’s leadership, vision, and commitment to the state of North Dakota and to its energy industry throughout his career have kept North Dakota at the forefront of energy development nationwide. He was instrumental in the state being granted regulatory authority over carbon dioxide wells, known as Class VI wells, which will help advance carbon capture and sequestration technology.

"Senator Hoeven has been a true champion of energy development in North Dakota," said Tom Erickson, EERC CEO. "This award is in recognition for his tireless dedication at the state and national level for advancing all forms of energy."

"Through its work to help produce more energy with greater efficiency, the EERC is helping to advance the long-term energy security of our nation," Hoeven said. "The EERC continues to develop important initiatives like carbon capture and storage technology which will help North Dakota's energy industry produce affordable, reliable energy for many years to come. I am grateful to work with the EERC to support energy development in North Dakota and throughout our nation, and I am honored to receive this award." 

The Energy Champion Award was created in 1986 to honor individuals who have demonstrated extraordinary personal commitment to energy and environmental research and development. Senator Hoeven is the tenth recipient of the award. Past recipients are Michael Jones, Senator Byron Dorgan, Thomas Bechtel, Everett Sondreal, Thomas Clifford, Senator Kent Conrad, John McFarlane, Conrad Aas, and Senator Mark Andrews. 

Photos from the event are available here: https://www.flickr.com/gp/undeerc/V4vUM4


Speakers left to right: Lignite Energy Council President and CEO Jason Bohrer, North Dakota Petroleum Council President Ron Ness, EERC Vice President for Strategic Partnerships John Harju, Senator Hoeven, UND President Mark Kennedy, and EERC CEO Tom Erickson. 


EPA Administrator Pruitt visits EERC

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, U.S. Senator John Hoeven, North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum, and EERC CEO Tom Erickson. Photo by Kari Suedel.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator, Scott Pruitt, stopped at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) on August 9. EERC leadership staff provided a brief tour of the facility. The group discussed the carbon capture work occurring at the EERC and the need for driving down the cost of carbon capture technology. They also discussed the state-of-the-art equipment and analysis in the Natural Materials Analytical Research Laboratory at the EERC and how this fundamental scientific work is unlocking the potential in the Bakken formation.

Mr. Pruitt's visit included a roundtable discussion, where he heard remarks from North Dakota energy and environment leaders, as well as lawmakers. Governor Doug Burgum, U.S. Senator John Hoeven, and U.S. Congressman Kevin Cramer were also in attendance. Mr. Pruitt's visit to North Dakota was coordinated through the Office of the Governor as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's State Action Tour. 

Photos from the event are available on the EERC's Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/gp/undeerc/dZom07

New Resource: North Dakota's Energy Future

North Dakota has a strong team of industry partners, state organizations, and universities dedicated to a more prosperous, cleaner, and brighter energy future. We are working with regional partners to advance technology to support an all-of-the-above approach to energy production, developing more synergies between energy and agriculture and a stronger, value-added approach to resources. Our new resource, "North Dakota's Energy Future," details seven goals developed as an outcome of our 2nd Annual Partnership Summit, which was held in June.

Download and print your own copy of "North Dakota's Energy Future" or contact EERC Communications Director Nikki Massmann for a digital copy.

Contact:
Nikki Massmann, 701.777.5428, nmassmann@undeerc.org  


EERC Reports Third Consecutive Year of Financial Growth

GRAND FORKS, N.D. – The University of North Dakota (UND) Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) announced financial growth for the third consecutive year for fiscal year 2017, which ended June 30. Total contracts awarded to the EERC were over $41 million, a significant increase over the two previous fiscal years’ contract funding of $36.5 million and $28.4 million, respectively. Annual awards have grown nearly 70% in the last 3 years, from $24.5 million in fiscal year 2014.

The EERC is a worldwide leader in the development of solutions to energy and environmental challenges. EERC contract funding comes from a variety of public and private organizations across the globe. To date, the EERC has worked with over 1,350 clients from over 50 countries. 

“This is the third year in a row that we have seen significant financial progress,” said EERC CEO Tom Erickson. “Our success is due to the incredible, hardworking people at the EERC and our clients who recognize the tremendous benefits of working with the EERC to advance technologies critical to our society.”

The EERC utilizes a focused approach on developing programs and client relationships to solve the world’s most pressing energy and environmental needs, attracting significant federal, state, and industry clients. Recently, the EERC outlined the incredible growth opportunity that exists in North Dakota to bring together the synergies of coal, oil and gas, renewable, and agricultural industries, resulting in significant opportunity for the state.

Erickson concluded, “I would like to acknowledge the tremendous effort by our staff this year for their work on our existing core programs, building exciting new initiatives and strengthening our presence in the state’s energy sector.”

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Contact:
Nikki Massmann, Director of Communications
701-777-5428, nmassmann@undeerc.org 

EERC Welcomes Brock Callina

The EERC is pleased to introduce our new Budget Analyst, Brock Callina. Brock supports clients, researchers, project managers, and senior management in the areas of cost management, personnel planning, cost projections, developing detailed cost proposals, and managing and overseeing multiple project budgets.

"I am excited to have the opportunity to work with such a wide array of people and projects on a regular basis." Brock noted, "and, as a 'money guy,' I like that I am able to see the different ways money flows from the beginning to the end of a project."

Brock holds a Bachelor of Business and Public Administration degree with a concentration in Investments from the University of North Dakota. Most recently, he worked as a Credit Analyst and Small Business Lender for Citizens Community Credit Union in Grand Forks. Prior to that, he worked as a Personal Banker and Business Advocate for Wells Fargo in Grand Forks.

Brock was born in California and moved as a child to Surrey, North Dakota, as his parents were military. He lived in Surrey until he started college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Brock and his wife have two children, a boy who is 4 and a girl who is almost 2. Outside of work, Brock enjoys woodworking and spending time with his family.

Introducing Dr. Phillip Levine

Phillip Levine EERCDr. Phillip Levine is a Geomodeler at the EERC, where he works with our clients to provide state-of-the-art geophysical models of the subsurface. He integrates a variety of data from different disciplines, including petrophysics, geophysics, geology, and engineering to create 3-D models. These models are used for dynamic simulations to predict the behavior of rocks under different scenarios.

"As exploration and development involve increasingly complex reservoirs, energy producers are relying more on geomodeling technology to simulate a reservoir before drilling a well to gain a better understanding of the heterogeneity within the reservoir," Phil said. "Geocellular models will continue to be a critical component of energy production as well as carbon storage."

Phil holds a Ph.D. degree in Geology from the University of South Carolina, Columbia; an M.S. degree in Geology from Syracuse University; and a B.S. degree in Biology-Geology from the University of Rochester. Phil previously worked as a software developer of geological and geophysical applications for most of his career.

"I started programming before there was such a thing as computer science, and there weren't a lot of geological and geophysical programs available to the industry. I have been involved with every aspect of the software life cycle, from specification through implementation and development, to technical marketing and sales, training, maintenance, and support," said Phil. "Later I took advantage of my geological training and became a geocellular modeler. I have been working as a modeler building 3-D geological interpretations for the last 12 years."

The opportunity to work as a modeler and conduct research at the University of North Dakota was one of the main attractions of Phil's new position at the EERC. He also finds the variety of EERC projects, including CO2 sequestration, to be challenging as well.

Interestingly, Phil credits undersea adventurer Jacque Cousteau for inspiring his career in energy. A biology major with an interest in marine life, Phillip was enticed by pictures of white sand beaches and palm trees on St. Croix and a presentation by students returning from the West Indies Laboratory there. He had to take several geology classes to get into the program and eventually spent a semester at the West Indies Lab. He had a great time at the lab, learned how his education could be applied to science and research, and started pursuing a Biology–Geology major to gain the necessary background for a student newly interested in carbonate environments.

Phil has a son who works as a stockbroker in Austin, Texas, and a daughter studying Musical Theater at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Although his family was his main focus when his kids were growing up, Phil said he has always managed to jog and ride his bicycle.